Homemade Wooden Imbucare Box

Do you remember those plastic toys that had five holes of different shapes? Perhaps a star, square, circle, triangle and rectangle? Have you seen a one year old get frustrated by the amount of holes and find it overwhelming? My child has one of these plastic toys, acquired as a hand-me-down or a gift, and absolutely hates it. This was before I new about Montessori materials for the toddler age (I always thought that 3 years old was the magic age). When I learned about object permanent boxes that only have one shape I thought that my son would appreciate and enjoy this activity. When I looked up buying them, I was surprised by the cost.

If you were to buy an Imbucare Box new these are the prices you are looking at:

When you think that you will be buying 2-4 different single shape boxes, the price adds up quickly! I am not very good at woodworking projects but knew that if I wanted something like this for my son, I would need to make it myself. After a failed attempt at making a box from birch wood bought from home depot (I said I wasn’t good at woodworking), I found an easier way. It is not the exact form of the Imbucare box, and I would improve this in the future, but for a first attempt it has worked rather well (and cheaply!).

At a local craft store that always provides coupons, I found these unfinished wooden boxes for 50% off. They already have a hinged lid and a small magnet that keeps the lid on. Using a circular drill bit, I cut a circle hole that fits the sphere and cone shape, so all I have to do is switch the pieces and it is a new toy. The shapes are the same brand as the box, as if I remember correctly was only $3 (plus 40% coupon of course). The shape bag comes with three each of squares, cones, spheres, and cylinder. I painted the cones blue with craft paint I had at my house.

The green tab you see in the above photo is because that tiny magnet works so well! I used a glue gun and a piece of ribbon to make a tab that my son could use to open the box; holding the bottom and pulling on the top is too much coordination for him at the moment. When I make a box for the square pieces, I would like to buy a square, instead of circular, box in order to cut out a whole for easy access as you see in the traditional boxes that are sold.

I was trying to make a wooden, and more permanent (pun intended), version of my previous homemade coin slot box. I would say my son currently prefers the plastic-took-me-two-minutes version; I am wondering if it is because he prefers the cards to the shapes, or doesn’t like the box itself. I’ll keep you updated!

Cost Savings: $3 for box at 50% off; $1.80 for shapes at 40% off = $4.80 versus $21-57 Multiply this by 3 boxes and watch your savings increase!