Pouring Milk and Scooping Cereal

My son used to like Cheerios but for some reason will only throw them on the ground now if we give him dry cereal- put milk in it and it’s another story! He cherishes his cereal with milk, I can’t argue with him there. If my husband or myself pour a bowl of cereal he runs to us with glee excited to get some cheerios soaked in milk. I thought that he would enjoy learning how to pour his own bowls.

First lesson in pouring milk from a pitcher and scooping cereal with a spoon: while it was a success in that he didn’t become frustrated and he remained concentrated, it was not a success in actually eating cereal. Maybe Lesson #2 will result in more caloric intake.

He has only poured one time (see blog post here on homemade pouring kit)- a fault in my not having a real location in my kitchen for his glass pitcher and cups and giving him exposure. The lack of experience showed when he went to pour the milk and I couldn’t resist the urge to keep the pitcher from spilling all over him by guiding it to the bowl. I would recommend having lots of practice with pouring water before introducing milk. I believe with education it is important to realize when children need to take a step back, or where you jumped too far ahead as a parent or educator.

The next and more complicated task comes with using a spoon to scoop, stabilize the spoon and bring it up to the mouth.

Attempt #2 and 3 with eating cereal went much better. I suppose I can’t expect him to not spill the first time. It is easy to forget how difficult new tasks are to small humans.

I have noticed a big difference in his ability to properly eat cereal depending on the spoon that I provide him. All of the spoons we own were hand me downs, so I don’t know all the brands. Shown in the picture below, the easiest spoon for our toddler is a plastic one with a loop handle. The loop makes it harder to dump out, meaning he is more likely to get it to his mouth with the cereal still on it! The munchkin spoon is the hardest because it is so long, he has trouble maneuvering it around; the shorter the handle the better.

Fun fact: The two spoons on the left that are the easiest for my son were hand-me-downs from my husband’s grandmother.

The two on the left are the easiest for my 16 month to wield

Letting your toddler do things by themselves is an act of iron will. It is very hard to watch someone use a spoon upside down and not intervene, or bring a spoon to their mouth and dump it one inch too soon. Teaching a toddler is a messy experience, but without this experience, we don’t give them room to grow. So get your sponges and cloths ready, because they are going to make a mess! Next lesson up? Cleaning up after ourselves!

Cost: Price of one small bowl of cereal

Advanced Learning: As my son grows, we can add steps to this: getting cereal out of cabinet and pouring it ourselves (baby step: providing a small tupperware of cereal to pour into bowl, big boy step: pouring from the box!), wiping up spills, cleaning dishes, shopping for cereal, learning where wheat and milk comes from.

Toddler Pouring Kit

When you walk through any baby aisle all you see are plastic cups, plastic spoons, plastic bowls and plates. Children are destructive we are told- don’t trust them with anything breakable. This all seems logical and all the non-destructible and non-spill items made sense to me. It does seem counter intuitive to give a 15 month old a glass pitcher. I handed my toddler a glass cup with trepidation. I held my breath as he looked at the new prize sitting on his table. I knew he was going to pick it up and throw it across the room. After it shattered into many pieces my golden retriever and my son would injure their feet on the shards of glass. As this went through my mind in excruciating detail, my son was unfazed. I am grateful that thoughts can’t be heard, for low and behold, he didn’t bang it, he didn’t break it; in fact, he held the glass in his hands with care. He picked it up with both hands and then set it back down on his table- then he repeated- pick it up, set it down, pick it up, set it down. Several of these practices and he took a sip.


Day one of giving him a glass cup and I made sure to stand right next to him. I did limit his time with the glass, as soon as he had taken a few sips, I praised his efforts and told him we would put the glass away until he was thirsty again. I made sure to not fill it too high in order to minimize spilling (for we did dribble some during drinking).

tiny hexagonal glass and glass pitcher sitting on a cloth napkin
$0.99 for glass $1.99 for the pitcher

Today made me think that the glass pitcher was not a mistake. He wasn’t ready for the pitcher today, but after giving him the next week to work on using his cup, I look forward to introducing him (with supervision) to pouring with the pitcher.

I found the hexagonal glass (better for gripping) and the pitcher at a local thrift store. I love buying from thrift stores for it keeps used items out of landfills. In addition, this particular thrift store runs the local homeless shelter- supporting the community and the environment through my consumerism. Who doesn’t like an excuse to feel good about shopping?

Costing a mere $3 for the the two items, here is a sample of what you would be paying if you were to buy this product new on amazon:

montessori pouring kit on amazon $15.95 + 10.95 shipping
Glassware is abundant at thrift stores- I highly recommend checking there first

Glassware is a very common item at thrift stores and a great place to save some money, especially on shipping! For a child size sponge, simply cut one a regular sponges in half.

Future Improvements: I still need to find some trays- one downside of thrifting, it does require some patience to find what you are looking for (or is learning patience a positive??)

Money Savings: $20-40

Outdoor Toddler Clothes Line

We’ve all been told the phrase “If you want something done right, do it yourself” at least once, if not multiple times. There is nothing farther from reality when teaching a toddler how to do chores. Today we worked on hanging our laundry outside. I didn’t plan on doing this, it was my son that taught me that he was ready and that I needed to include him.

toddler hanging shirt on laundry line

My son was standing beside me fussing and whining. I was focused on the task of getting the laundry up and trying to get him to play independently (i.e. chase our dog around the yard). When he wouldn’t let up, I gave him one of his shirts and told him to put it on the line, gently guiding his hand. He beamed with pride when it stayed up! I handed him another one, he focused on getting it on the line, it fell, but he just asked for another piece of clothing.

I know that I need to be more patient and slow down. I can thank my son for helping me to teach him. Sure he piled the clothes into one area or half of them fell down and I had to go back later and fix them, but that was not what my son saw. He learned how to do something new, he enjoyed working alongside me, and he felt pride in his work. Perhaps next time his coordination and his attention span will be longer.

Getting distracted by birds chirping

Adult to toddler hack: In order to make our clothesline toddler friendly, we just added a rope at his height at the bottom. Cost= $0. Time=5 minutes

Advanced Lessons: for older toddlers and children you can incorporate lessons on solar energy and/or practical life of folding clothes after they have dried